Check-In, Monday, December 17

Well, folks, it looks like we have almost made it to the Christmas break.

This will be my last message to you of the year, and, perhaps not surprisingly, this is often a time in the calendar when I find myself looking back on the year that was. 

And I have to admit, it is not a pretty picture.

2018 was, yet again, a year of incredible strain and tension between the employer and its teachers. With the release of the Glaze report and the subsequent adoption of so many of its recommendations, the educational landscape of our province has been fundamentally changed, perhaps forever. Even now, as the year closes, some of the victories that we were able to claim around Bill 72, such as the prevention of the creation of a College of Teachers, appear to perhaps be in jeopardy.

As pressure continues to be applied by those who would adopt a private enterprise, made-in-Ontario model for our schools, we see teachers remaining a favourite target. This can be evidenced by the recent media declaration that the government is drafting legislation to have teachers under go criminal record checks every five years. There are many things wrong with the way this issue was dealt with, not the least of which involves scope and sequence. That this legislation appears, at least as far as I can tell, to be only designed for NSTU members and not any of the other bargaining units within our schools seems to smack of public placation rather than of sound educational practice.

With the loss of our administrators, the abolition of elected school boards, and the continued lack of meaningful consultation with teachers, things do seem rather bleak.

However, I for one, have not given up hope.

The reason for that is quite simple, really. I believe in teachers.

Not from any pie in the sky vision of “the teacher as martyr” stereotype that I have been accused of so often promoting in my writing, nor from any glassy eyed reminiscence of teachers who may have helped me along my own individual journey.

Rather, I believe in them because of what I see when I visit schools, where the walls are still dripping proudly with student work. I believe in them because of how, even after all that has happened, I still hear the honest joy in their voices when they talk about their students. I believe in them because when they call me, often in their darkest times, they still speak of an abject love of the profession, even when the demands of that profession have taken a tremendous personal toll. Perhaps most importantly, I have seen, through my own experience as a dad, their capacity to help students navigate challenging circumstances, giving up of their own time and energy even when so many have so little left to give.

It could be that Frank Magazine was right about me; maybe I do see teachers through some heavily rose tinted glasses. But every day that I sit as your Local President, through every phone call and through every crises one thing remains perfectly clear.

Ours is a noble profession. Everyday we get up and go to a job that allows us to to something good for somebody’s child. Teaching is an altruistic act that sees us spending whatever energy and experience and passion we have in the pursuit of a common, all encompassing goal; the betterment of others. We may not always do the right thing or say the right thing or serve all of our students’ needs all of the time, but we spend every moment of our professional lives, and often a considerable chunk of or personal ones, trying to do just that.

And there has never been, nor ever will be, a piece of legislation that can take that away.

All the best to you and yours in 2019.

Grant 

 

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